My Top Five Books and Movies of 2020

Updated: Feb 20, 2021

I'll skip the sentiment about the year 2020 (it sucked) and get straight to the point.


Favorite readings, in no particular order: 1. Why We Sleep - Matthew Walker


To my colleagues, family, and friends, this book has probably caused the most annoyance. After reading this, I cannot shut up about the importance of sleep nor the fascinating way it affects all aspects of life.





2. The Moral Landscape / Free Will - Sam Harris


While technically two books, Sam Harris’ Free Will is a great essay (60pg) precursor to his longer The Moral Landscape. Both will have you questioning the moral virtue of decisions that you make in everyday life and whether you have any control over them at all.





3. The Simple Path to Wealth - J. L. Collins


Before reading this book, I knew very little about investing or managing multiple streams of income. While I tend to stay away from finance books to avoid “get rich quick” nonsense, this book gives great information while remaining light and full of humour.





4. Atomic Habits - James Clear


Understanding the science behind habit formation is important for implementing change into your life. This book will provide you with both the path to follow and the tools necessary to achieve lasting change.





5. The Uninhabitable Earth - David Wallas Wells


While many label this book as alarmist, I believe Wells’ provides a necessary array of potential outcomes for earth and humanity should we not course correct our climate trajectories.





Honorable Mention:


Brave New World - Aldous Huxley

 

Favorite viewings, in no particular order:

1. Okja - Bong Joon-ho


An entrancing story that wonderfully captures the emotional aptitude of animals -- something that we often take for granted. Was this decision influenced by my decision to go vegetarian this year? Perhaps.





2. My Life as a Zucchini - Claude Barras


Sometimes capturing raw, serious emotion is best done through animation.




3. Shoplifters - Hirokazu Koreeda


I feel that Tokyo is often romanticized in the west. Shoplifters does an excellent job of portraying class structure in Japan, reminding us that (as with any country) it’s not all glamour.




4. Jojo Rabbit - Taika Waititi


Mixing satire and drama is tough -- Jojo Rabbit excels at both.





5. A Taxi Driver - Jang Hoon


What starts as a fluffy comedy quickly turns into an emotional rollercoaster. If you enjoy starch contrast in emotional tone throughout a movie, this one's for you.




Honorable mentions:


After watching the masterpiece that was Parasite, I felt the need to explore more of Bong Joon-ho’s films. Needless to say, his previous films are also incredible.


Mother - Bong Joon-ho

Memories of Murder - Bong Joon-ho



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